Apple iPhone Death Grip

Reviewers’ Views on Apple iPhone “Death Grip”

After Apple has given a new design to the antenna on a device that caused problems for AT&T iPhone users, the jury is now deciding whether the network of Verizon Wireless iPhone is glitch-free or not.

The magazine Consumer Reports has just unveiled that they would not recommend Verizon iPhone 4 after the results in the lab tests showed that the device had problems when held in a particular way, commonly referred to as the “death grip”.

It also showed that decrease or failure of calls could be caused by the interruptions in weal signal conditions.

The device was exposed to different tests and was compared to other five Verizon Wireless smartphones that were highly regarded by the Consumer Reports like Samsung Fascinate, Motorola Droid 2 Global, HTC Droid Incredible, LG Ally and Motorola Droid X.

Paul Reynolds from Consumer Reports said, “We then placed a finger to each phone in a range of locations around its edge, and monitored any change to the phone’s performance at each position.  The only phone in which the finger contact caused any meaningful decline in performance was the iPhone 4….”

Apple iPhone Death Grip

The glitches started when the newly designed antenna was placed into the $ 29 frame-like Apple iPhone 4 Bumper.

On the other hand, AnandTech discovered last month that the antenna-related problems have now been resolved on a new CDMA device featuring two antennas.  Brian Klug of AnandTech wrote, “Death grip is essentially mitigated.  I feel completely confident using the CDMA iPhone 4 without a case, and did so for the duration of all this testing without once dropping off the network. Getting a case still makes sense, but using the phone without one is no longer something that will dramatically affect phone usability.”

AnandTech found last month that the antenna-related problems that plagued the iPhone 4 on AT&T’s network have largely been solved on a new CDMA device that features two antennas.  “Death grip is essentially mitigated,” Brian Klug of AnandTech wrote.  “I feel completely confident using the CDMA iPhone 4 without a case, and did so for the duration of all this testing without once dropping off the network. Getting a case still makes sense, but using the phone without one is no longer something that will dramatically affect phone usability.”

Klug said problems encountered will be depending on how the user handles the device.  If the iPhone users hold it in a weird way, signal problems may still be experienced.

“There’s still a way to make signal drop dramatically – cover both antennas. I call this move the double-fist, since it literally requires you to cup both the top and bottom of the phone like some sort of deranged squirrel,” he writes.  “You could try and argue that this is still sort of like deathgrip, but it’s in no way a natural way of holding the phone, ever.

photo credit: www.abc.net.au