Other Useless Facts 5

  • The foundations of the great European cathedrals go down as far as forty or fifty feet. In some instances, they form a mass of stone as great as that of the visible building above the ground.
  • Police dogs are trained to react to commands in a foreign language; commonly German but more recently Hungarian.
  • The roads on the island of Guam are made with coral. Guam has no sand. The sand on the beaches is actually ground coral. When concrete is mixed, the coral sand is used instead of importing regular sand from thousands of miles away.
  • The Holland and Lincoln Tunnels under the Hudson River connecting New Jersey and New York are an engineering feat. The air circulators in the tunnels circulate fresh air completely every ninety seconds.
  • The official soft drink of the state of Nebraska – Kool-Aid.
  • Ivory Soap was originally named P&G White Soap. In 1879, Harley Proctor found the new name during a reading in church of the 45th Psalm of the Bible: “All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia, out of ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad.”
  • Studebaker still exists, but is now called Worthington.
  • 7.5 million toothpicks can be created from a cord of wood.
  • A McDonald’s straw will hold 7.7ml, or just over one-and-a-half teaspoons of whatever you are drinking. This means that it would take 17,000 strawfuls of water to fill up a 34 gallon bathtub.
  • The original IBM punch-card is the same size as a Civil War era dollar bill.
  • BAND-AID Brand Adhesive Bandages first appeared on the market in 1921, however, the little red string that is used to open the package did not get added until 1940.
  • Jane Barbie was the woman who did the voice recordings for the Bell System.
  • Month after month, the little Bell Company lived from hand to mouth. No salaries were paid in full. Often, for weeks, they were not paid at all. In Watson’s notebook there are such entries during this period as “Lent Bell fifty cents,” “Lent Hubbard twenty cents,” “Bought one bottle beer—too bad can’t have beer every day.”
  • When Bell’s patent was sixteen months old, there were 778 telephones in use.
  • The first “Hello” badge used to identify guests and hosts at conventions, parties, etc. was traced back to September 1880. It was on that date that the first Telephone Operators Convention was held at Niagara Falls and the “Hello” badge was created for that event.